Skip Navigation
Login or register
Worlds Apart in the Same Town? A Qualitative Comparison of Pre- and Post-clinical Themes Assessing Student Nurse Perceptions of Homeless, Mentally Ill Clients
Author(s):
No Recommendations Yet Click here to recommend.
Add Comment
Subscribe
Share This
Print
No Recommendations Yet Click here to recommend.
Student nurses' negative attitudes towards men who are homeless and mentally ill disrupt development of therapeutic relationships. Without therapeutic relationships these men may feel stigmatized. Assessing student attitudes allows for insights to improve students' abilities to develop therapeutic relationships. The purpose of this research was to assess student nurses' pre- and post-perceptions towards homeless mentally ill clients during a mental health clinical through analysis of pictorial data (Authors).
Student nurses' negative attitudes towards men who are homeless and mentally ill disrupt development of therapeutic relationships. Without therapeutic relationships these men may feel stigmatized. Assessing student attitudes allows for insights to improve students' abilities to develop therapeutic relationships. The purpose of this research was to assess student nurses' pre- and post-perceptions towards homeless mentally ill clients during a mental health clinical through analysis of pictorial data. Data was analyzed through a qualitative, phenomenological method. On the first and last days of clinical experience, students were asked to draw a picture in response to the question: "How far apart are you from these men?" We analyzed pre- and post-drawings separately and changes were compared. Four pre-attitude themes and two post-attitude themes were identified. Pre-attitude themes demonstrated student drawings as geographically distanced from the clients and living in two different worlds. Post-drawings reflected themes where clients and students were under the same roof and often physically touching. We suggest using this easily reproducible, inexpensive method to gain insights into student attitudes. The difference in the drawings objectively demonstrates the effectiveness of clinical experiences in changing student nurse attitudes towards men who are homeless and mentally ill (Authors).
Journal
2014
Nurse Education Today
34
3
306-312
Related Items
RSS Feed
About Us  -  Contact Us
Home  -  Training  -  Homelessness Resource Center Library  -  Facts  -  Topics  -  Partners  -  Events  -  PATH  -  SSH
Advanced Search
Acknowledgements -  Help -  Accessibility -  SAMHSA Privacy Policy -  Plain Language -  Disclaimer -  SAMHSA Web Site
Download PDF Reader
A program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services