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2007 Recalibration of the Business Plan for Ending Long-Term Homelessness in Minnesota
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In 2003, leaders from public, private and nonprofit communities in Minnesota decided to launch an all-out effort to bring people home, beginning with those who have long histories of homelessness. Based on legislation proposed by Governor Tim Pawlenty and adopted by the Legislature, a Working Group was formed that developed a Business Plan to End Long-Term Homelessness by 2010, primarily by creating 4,000 units of permanent supportive housing. The idea behind the Business Plan was to tackle a complex social problem – long-term homelessness – in a business-like manner, defining a strategy, setting goals for each year of the plan, outlining a financing strategy, evaluating progress, and adjusting the Plan to reflect experience.

Three years have passed since the Business Plan was launched; it is time to take stock and readjust where necessary. One of the hallmarks of the Plan is its transparency— in both development and ongoing implementation. Stakeholders were engaged in formulating the plan and the public was fully informed about the strategies, assumptions and resulting financing plan. That level of transparency is continued in this document, which reviews all assumptions and experience to date. The recalibration of the Plan is based on facts set forth in this report – facts that can be broadly reviewed and analyzed. (Authors)
Report
2007
St. Paul, MN
651-296-7608
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