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Housing Needs of Persons with HIV and AIDS in New York State
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Objective: To understand the scope and magnitude of housing needs among persons with HIV/AIDS in New York State.

Design: Both housing providers and non-housing providers were identified through state-wide lists and regional resource guides. All identified housing providers and a random sample of identified non-housing providers, by region, were approached. Interviewers conducted telephone interviews with qualified representatives from each organization.

Respondents: All major providers of HIV/AIDS housing services (n = 144) and a random sample of other providers of HIV/AIDS services (n = 87) were interviewed. Variables Under Study: Data that were gathered included: agency profiles, client demographics, and clients’ need for and use of housing services.

Results: One-third of housing agency clients were either homeless or living in a welfare hotel, while one-tenth of non-housing agency clients lived under such conditions. Nearly one-third of all clients were living doubled-up, and half had problems paying for rent or utilities. The majority of clients required supportive services such as substance abuse treatment or mental health care.

Conclusions: With the advent of protease inhibitor therapy, stable and adequate housing has become especially critical for persons with HIV/AIDS. However, public assistance ‘reforms’ are likely to exacerbate their housing needs, and may ultimately compromise the potential benefits of treatment. (Author)
Journal
2001
13
2
61-73
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