Skip Navigation
Login or register
HIV Risk Practices Among Homeless and Low-income Housed Mothers
No Recommendations Yet Click here to recommend.
Add Comment
Subscribe
Share This
Print
No Recommendations Yet Click here to recommend.
BACKGROUND. Knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and its risk behaviors have not been systematically studied in homeless mothers. The identification of the factors associated with HIV-risk practices will guide interventions for low-income housed and homeless women.

METHODS. We interviewed 220 homeless and 216 low-income housed mothers living in Worcester, Massachusetts, to gather information on demographic, psychosocial, and HIV-risk practice characteristics. We used standardized instruments and questions drawn from national surveys. The primary study outcome was high HIV-risk behavior.

RESULTS. Although homeless mothers were more likely than low-income housed mothers to report first sexual contact at an early age, multiple partners during the last 6 months, and a history of intravenous drug use, homelessness was not associated with high HIV-risk practices. Both homeless and low-income housed mothers demonstrated misconceptions about HIV transmission through casual contact. Among high-risk women, approximately 75% perceived themselves as having low or no risk for contracting HIV. A history of childhood victimization, adult partner violence, or both placed women at a significantly increased likelihood of high HIV-risk practices. African American race, knowledge about HIV, and self-perception of risk were also significantly associated with high-risk practices.

CONCLUSIONS. Homeless mothers are a subgroup of poor women at high risk for HIV and should be targeted for preventive interventions. In addition, there are potentially modifiable factors associated with HIV-risk practices in both low-income housed and homeless mothers that should be directly addressed. (Authors)
Journal
1999
48
11
859-867
RSS Feed
About Us  -  Contact Us
Home  -  Training  -  Homelessness Resource Center Library  -  Facts  -  Topics  -  Partners  -  Events  -  PATH  -  SSH
Advanced Search
Acknowledgements -  Help -  Accessibility -  SAMHSA Privacy Policy -  Plain Language -  Disclaimer -  SAMHSA Web Site
Download PDF Reader
A program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services