Voices from the Field Blog: Circumstances & Hope

by Darby Penney
March 16, 2015

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Homeless and Housing Resource Network Contributing Writer Darby Penney writes about how Glenn Schaefer turned his struggle with homelessness and depression into a book with a message of hope and empowerment for people experiencing homelessness. Schaefer emerged from these circumstances heartened by the kindness of strangers.

Almost overnight, after Glenn T. Schaefer was laid off from a good-paying job selling radio advertising, his life came crashing down around him. He lost the new home for which he could no longer afford the mortgage payments, as well as his new car. His wife left him. He became homeless. The friends who had been there during the good times now kept their distance. He found himself despondent, with suicidal feelings, and admitted himself to a psychiatric unit for the first–but not the last–time. 

This episode began a long, halting, but ultimately successful comeback journey from homelessness and depression that Schaefer chronicles in his recent book, Oh! You’re One of Those People...: A Whimsical Two Year Journey of Depression, Desperation, and Detainment (Dog Ear Press, 2014). “Many people don’t realize how easy it is to become homeless,” he said. “A lost job, a broken relationship—it can just cascade. And suddenly the losses pile up, and you find yourself on someone’s couch, in a shelter, or on the street.”

Why would one describe such a difficult experience as “whimsical?” Schaefer says he wasn’t being ironic in his choice of words; he kept looking for the bright spots during the hard times. But another reason, he says, in retrospect, is that perhaps he took a self-deprecating, darkly humorous tone as a way to cover the pain he experienced during the two years he spent homeless. 

After he lost his job, home, and family, Schaefer returned to his hometown to stay with his mother. This arrangement didn’t work out, and he found himself down and out among the people he had grown up with in his hometown. In some ways, he says, it might have been easier being homeless in the anonymity of a big city. It was hard to have people he had known as a youngster look down on him or pity him.

The book’s title comes from a painful episode. During the time he was homeless, Schaefer often slept in temporary shelters in his hometown, sleeping in a different host church every night. One Sunday, he attended the morning service at the Methodist church, sitting in a back pew, trying not to stand out in the crowd. During the service, the pastor asked congregants to turn and greet their neighbors. The woman in front of him turned to shake his hand, smiling, and then a guarded look came over her face. “I recognize you, don’t I?” she asked. “You’re one of those people who stay in the basement.” 

Recognizing that it might be easier to start over in a place where no one knew him, Schaefer made his way to North Carolina, where he eventually found a part-time job and a temporary place to stay. But after a while, he “ran out of bridges to burn,” and felt like he needed to make a fresh start. In desperation, he called an old friend and said, “I just can’t do this anymore.” His friend sent him a train ticket to Memphis and took him in. “I was tired of carrying everything I owned in a gym bag and sleeping on park benches,” he said. “I was ready to work to get my life back.”

He had done some writing during his media career, and he started making notes about his experiences with homelessness and depression. At first, he had no plans to write a book: “It was just ‘bar napkin therapy’ for me at the beginning,” Schaefer said. It helped him sort things out, he says, and he kept writing in fits and starts.  But eventually it was the compassion shown by strangers that motivated him to keep writing.

Schaefer points out that while some people he encountered reacted like the disapproving woman in the church, other people—total strangers—were incredibly kind. The day before Christmas Eve, he was standing in line at Kmart to pick up his blood pressure medication and found that he did not have enough money to pay for it. He walked away, but the pharmacist called him back; someone behind him in line had covered the cost of his prescription. Another night, he was wandering aimlessly in a snowstorm and was rescued by a registered nurse just coming off her shift. Her compassion helped him resolve to write down the stories of what he has learned from this difficult part of his life.

The message he wants to send through his book is simple, Schaefer says. “I want people who are homeless to understand that it is not hopeless. Most people need someone to tell them that they won’t give up on them, that they are a decent person, and that they can turn their life around. It helped me when people treated me that way, and it can help others.”

Glenn Schaefer’s book, Oh! You’re One of Those People...: A Whimsical Two Year Journey of Depression, Desperation, and Detainment, is available for purchase at Amazon.com or at Barnes & Noble.

Interested in being an HRC Guest Blogger? Email us at HomelessPrograms@samhsa.hhs.gov.

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Limitless Potential

by Valerie Gold
December 20, 2013

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Homeless and Housing Resource Network contributing writer Valerie Gold recounts the experience joining a team of runners from Back On My Feet, an organization that uses running to help people experiencing homelessness change the way they see themselves and to achieve real change. 

So much of the work to address homelessness involves waiting: waiting for people’s names to rise to the top of various lists, waiting for apartments to pass inspection, waiting for replacement documents, approvals, or funds. Waiting, and its accompanying frustrations, contribute to the sense of powerlessness and hopelessness endured by many people experiencing homelessness.

As 2014 begins, Back On My Feet (BOMF) is not waiting, but instead is racing forward with its mission to use running to help people experiencing homelessness to realize their own power and to achieve real change. With the addition of two new chapters in the last twelve months, BOMF now operates running teams based in homeless shelters in eleven cities across the country. Nearly 400 individuals experiencing homelessness are running with these teams each month. Eighty-two percent report that their health is good or excellent, and 94 percent describe themselves as hopeful about their futures. And so far, 46 percent of BOMF runners have obtained employment, housing, or both.

The Monday before Thanksgiving, I joined the team of BOMF runners who live at the New England Shelter for Homeless Veterans for a pre-dawn run. The team assembled at 5:20 a.m. in the lobby of the shelter. The runners were easy to spot, bundled up in BOMF tracksuits and shod in bright new running shoes. As we waited for a few volunteers (referred to as "nonresident team members") to arrive, Eric,* a tall and friendly vet with an easy laugh, described the 5K race in South Boston that he had run the day before through a fierce wind and temperatures well below freezing. This was his first race, he said, and he almost stopped several times, but was urged on by Kathleen, BOMF’s Program Coordinator, who ran with him the entire way to set his pace and make sure that he achieved his goal of completing the event.

Once everyone arrived, we moved outside, formed a circle, did some jumping jacks to warm up, and then put our arms around one another and recited the Serenity Prayer. And then we were off. I settled in to run next to Joe, an elegantly-coiffed runner with a white goatee whose pace accelerated as the stars faded and the moon slowly set, until I nearly collapsed from trying to keep up with him. The physical suffering was worth it, as Joe was a great conversationalist, expounding upon the concepts of self-efficacy and mental toughness as I gasped and groaned and otherwise generally displayed my lack of any toughness – mental or otherwise. When I finally gave up and waved Joe on, I was immediately joined by a group of women from the Common Ground Team. One of them had her arm in a sling, and all of them shivered cheerfully as they introduced themselves and told me how long they had been on the team. I had no idea which of them were people experiencing homelessness and which of them were nonresident team members. This is part of what works about BOMF– by building teams of runners instead of groups of givers and recipients of support, of assistance, of anything but fellowship and mutual encouragement and accountability, BOMF makes it possible for people who have experienced terrible things, including great isolation, to resocialize and reconnect with others, while building or rebuilding key aspects of their identities: as athletes, teammates, morning people, or just plain survivors. At the same time, nonresident runners have the opportunity to connect in a meaningful and immediately rewarding way with people with whom they might otherwise never be engaged.

After my run, I followed the Boston BOMF staff back to the offices that they occupy, courtesy of Comcast. Victor, Kathleen, and Allison, all fearsomely fit, energetic, and passionate about their work, described their goals for doubling the number of BOMF runners in Boston, and for maximizing the positive impact of their program through strategic partnerships with homeless service providers and individualized supports for runners. They shared challenges, ranging from the easily addressed (advising a new team member that he should relieve himself before leaving the shelter as opposed to doing so mid-run in front of his teammates) to the more complex, like the heightened risk of substance abuse relapse, arrest, or other crisis occurring during the weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. Running alone won’t eliminate this risk, of course, but it can help, and the accountability and sense of belonging that comes from being on a team provides further protection. As Victor, the Boston Executive Director, shared his plans for "over programming" with movie nights, dinners, and races during this period, his investment in the safety and success of each team member was clear.

BOMF is more than a novel idea or a promising practice. It is a reminder that the people we work with in outreach programs and homeless shelters have limitless potential for healing and growth. Running is a great way to tap into this potential. It changes a person from the inside out, and provides a daily demonstration of the lesson so eloquently articulated within BOMF’s vision statement: If we keep moving forward, we arrive someplace different, we arrive stronger and often as better versions of ourselves.

Of course, running is not the only way to move forward or fulfill potential. As 2014 begins, I challenge myself and my colleagues to stop waiting and take inspiration from BOMF to search for new and better ways to be reminded of the tremendous power that each of us holds within.

*Permission was granted by all of the individuals identified in this piece to share first names.

Interested in being a HRC Guest Blogger? Email us at generalinquiry@center4si.com.

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Voices From the Field: Bearing Witness to Self-Sufficiency

by Kevin Lilly
September 24, 2013

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Youth homelessness is a major problem. There are many young people on the street on a given night with nowhere to go and no access to adequate shelter. That being said, with every social injustice in the world today, you have people who work tirelessly to fight for change. These activists don’t do this for any attention or reward, but because they want to see a difference and see an eventual end to a perpetual problem.  Bridge over Troubled Water (BOTW) is an organization that since its inception in the 1970’s has helped over 80,000 homeless and runaway youth out of the grips of poverty and into self-sufficiency. This shelter may look like an ordinary cozy house like its neighbors on the street, but the power within is something that you just need to visit for yourself to experience.

One of the case managers, Theresa Heisler known by everyone as “Terri”, a 23-year veteran, was gracious enough to give me a tour of the shelter. At this particular location, they deal with four primary groups of young adults: males, females, runaways, and young mothers with children. Each group has their own housing area, but they come together for community dinners and social events. When I arrived, I spent most of my time in the young mothers building. During the tour, I noticed the housing itself is well kept. Fridges are filled with healthy choices, and the mothers have a monthly trip to BJ’s, a wholesale warehouse grocery and retail store. The bedrooms are tidy and the young people are encouraged to keep the house clean and organized. I could go on about the housing itself, but the power of this shelter isn’t so much in the housing as much as it is the people in it.

These mothers are nothing short of amazing young women. As a young man I can’t imagine all the work that goes into raising a child. These young women also work (some working multiple jobs) and complete assigned house tasks and attend classes. It’s inspiring to hear their stories of survival to make it to where they are today. A few stories Terri told me were tough to hear. One mother shared that she had become homeless after an unfortunate incident forced her out of her family’s house. Then she lost custody of her son. She ended up coming to the BOTW shelter where she worked hard to get her son back. She continues to work 40+ hours a week at popular restaurant chain while enrolled in a BOTW GED program as well. This is one of many powerful stories that I came across in that shelter. These young people have been through a lot. As Terri put it, “It’s like they are carrying the weight of the world on their shoulder”. What I admire about all these young people is that although life has them on the ropes and is hitting them with everything it got, they continue to fight and endure.

What BOTW hopes to do is not only to offer these young people in need safe and adequate shelter, but to teach skills so that they could one day successfully make the transition from shelter to permanent housing. Young people staying in the shelter are encouraged to make preparations for independent living. They are assigned house tasks specifically to ensure they have a good foundation once they move out and will need to perform household duties in their own apartment. The shelter also provides the young people with resources to not only get on their feet, but have fun as well. Throughout the buildings, there are bulletin boards filled with information about free events, job postings, employment opportunities, as well as healthcare resources.

The staff members are incredible men and women. I didn’t get a chance to meet all of them but Terri, Cynthia, and Steve are three people who genuinely care and work tirelessly, to help young people. While some people might see these young people’s present circumstances alone, staff members at BOTW see their untapped potential. Shelter staff members are present 24 hours a day, and are really invested in these young people’s lives. As Terri put it, “We try to find out who they are, what they like, help them with their self esteem, and meet their goals so that one day these kids could have the life they dream about.”

While on the tour I came across an image that I feel does a great job in summing the program, the people, and the shelter. This image was a photo taken during a recent graduation. In the picture it shows one young mother smiling proudly in her cap and gown with her handsome son dressed up right by her side. The picture is just one of many successful stories that come out of this house. It shows that although the odds appear to be stacked, one can always overcome. This whole experience has made me even more grateful for the support system and opportunities I have in my life. It also energizes me to do more as far as being an advocate for unaccompanied homeless youth. As a young person I know I would not be where I am today had it not been for the great support system around me.

Interested in being a HRC Guest Blogger? Email us at generalinquiry@center4si.com.

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Category: General | Guest Entry